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Balancing the Grind With Kelly Campino, Leadership & Wellbeing Coach

Kelly Campino is a  Leadership & Wellbeing Coach helping mid-career professionals with leadership behaviours, corporate strategy, quality improvement and more.

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1. To kick things off, could you tell us a little about your career background and current role?

I work with ambitious leaders who want to perform at their best, but they’re struggling with overwhelm, high levels of stress and a multitude of challenges at work, and as a result their work performance and passion – as well as physical, mental and emotional wellbeing – have been impacted.

I utilise positive psychology knowledge and tools to help my clients develop and strengthen their authentic leadership identity; define what fulfilling work means to them; and support them to embed sustainable actions to improve their wellbeing – and thrive at work – no matter what the challenges or environment.

Before I started my coaching practice, I spent more than 15 years within large international companies in Australia and Switzerland, and during this time managed effective communication and engagement strategies and campaigns, designed to encourage and support employees to give their best.

Topics I’ve worked on include leadership behaviours, corporate strategy, quality improvement, diversity & inclusion and health & safety.

Originally from Australia and now calling Switzerland home, I work with clients worldwide and am in the final stages of my MSc Applied Positive Psychology and Coaching Psychology at the University of East London.

2. What does a day in the life look like for you? Can you take us through a recent workday?

Most days I get up at 5.15am to have a quiet coffee and review my day’s plans before the kids get up. I also use this time to watch a uni lecture or correspond with my web designer and digital media manager who are in Australia.

After that, no work day is typical, but they normally include a combination of: meditation and journaling; school runs with Leo my golden retriever; client calls and follow ups; writing for assignments or newsletters; making lunch for my girls and their friends; working with my supervisor or my own coaches; researching or studying; putting the washing on; calling my parents in Australia and most days a HIIT workout at home.

3. Does your current role allow for flexible or remote working? If so, how does that fit into your life and routine?

My work is 100% flexible. I work from home at the times that suit my family and I the best. This can include early mornings, when the kids are at school, evenings and weekends.

4. Do you have any tips, tricks or shortcuts to help you manage your workload and schedule?

After plenty of trial and error, I’ve learned that when I plan well, meditate and exercise daily, set a clear intent before starting a task and am gentle with myself, I’m very well set up to be efficient and accomplish what’s most important.

5. What does work-life balance mean to you and how do you work to achieve that goal?

It’s a constant process of reviewing and recalibrating, but I’ve learned to really listen to my mind and body and give it what it needs so that I can be efficient and happy at work, and a present and healthy coach, wife, and mum to my daughters (and dog!).

Unfortunately, I know what it’s like to let the balance slip too much and be on the brink of burnout, so I now take my work-life balance much more seriously.

With the wellbeing and positive psychology knowledge that I’m gaining from my MSc, as well as techniques I learned in therapy to manage overwhelm and prevent getting close to burnout again, I feel very well-equipped to assess my balance and take action when needed.

6. What do you think are some of the best habits you’ve developed over the years to help you strive for success and balance?

  • Developing a sustainable mindfulness practice.
  • Finding an exercise routine that works for me.
  • Improving my self-compassion.
  • Getting support from experienced coaches to know myself better, help me set goals and challenge me to exceed them in a way that is aligned with my character and strengths.

7. Are there any books that have helped you improve over the years?

My positive psychology textbooks. They’ve taken the guesswork out of achieving balance, and have taught me the scientific framework of wellbeing.

My recommendation is the first text I read: Positive Psychology: Theory, Research and Applications by my university lecturers Kate Hefferon and Ilona Boniwell.

8. What is the number one thing you do to make sure you get the most out of your day?

Have my to-do list aligned with my appointments, deadlines and goals.

9. Do you have any last thoughts on work, life or balance that you’d like to share with our readers?

Yes I do! Two things:

  1. Put yourself first. I know it’s easier said than done, but when you are healthy – mentally, physically and emotionally – then you’re able to give more to others.
  2. Recognise when your balance starts feel off; take a break and do something positive and that feels good for you; and if needed, ask for help from a partner, friend or coach.

If you’d like to have a conversation with us about how you balance the grind, get in touch with us!

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About Author

Balance The Grind gives me a platform to talk to these people about how they're achieving their ideal lifestyle. I'm inspired by the passion, the work ethic, the hustle; and these conversations motivate me to live life the way I want to live it.